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Study Skills

Good academic practice and avoiding plagiarism

An online tutorial on good academic practice & avoiding plagiarism

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a form of academic misconduct, using ideas or the work of another person and presenting it as your own work. It is dishonest, unprofessional and poor scholarship. It is a breach of the University's "Rules of Behaviour" and is a form of cheating. For information visit the University's Definition of Academic Misconduct. Examples of plagiarism might include cutting and pasting work, using essay mills or closely paraphrasing another’s ideas, writing or design.

Collusion is a form of plagiarism where two or more people work together to produce a piece of work but where all or part of the work is submitted as their own work. Group work where students are encouraged to work together to produce a single piece of work for assessment is not collusion.

For more information on Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct at the University of Cambridge see this webpage:

http://www.plagiarism.admin.cam.ac.uk/

Test your understanding of plagiarism

Reading the information above and at http://www.plagiarism.admin.cam.ac.uk/. Think whether you agree with the statements below and click on them to see if the answers are TRUE or FALSE

FALSE. Mixing a few words of an article with your own is often throught of as paraphrasing, but this is not the way to paraphrase in your work. Look at the paraphrasing section for more information on how to paraphrase well.

FALSE. If you are submitting the work as your own, you should be the only person writing it. If you are submitting group with more than one contributor, make sure all the contributions are acknolwedged

FALSE. Information and content that is not your own work needs to be referenced regardless of where it is located. Referencing acknowledges another persons' work and is good academic practice. See our section on referencing for more information.

TRUE. All information, including statistics, images, diagrams and tables where the work is not your own need to be referenced. Look at the referencing section for more information.

FALSE. Information and content that is not your own work needs to be referenced regardless of whether it is published or not. This includes your own work as well. Referencing acknowledges the original work and is good academic practice. See our section on referencing for more information.

 

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