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Subject Guides

English Literature: Researching a Topic

Using journal articles

If you're looking for a specific item, the easiest way to track it down is by using the library catalogue, iDiscover. Type a few words from the article's title into the search box. If the article is available online (and many of them are) then you should be able to get to it directly by clicking 'Full text available'. If it isn't online, then iDiscover will tell you where copies of the print journal can be found.

In the ASNC collection at the English Faculty Library, the ASNC journals are shelved under E 109 in the Discussion Room on the first floor.

If you're looking for articles on a given topic, add a few keywords to the search box on iDiscover. Be careful with your search terms, and try synonyms if you're not getting the results you hoped for.

iDiscover logo

You can see the whole list of journals the university subscribes to on the ejournals website. Other useful ways to search for journal articless include Google Scholar, Project Muse and JStor.

Scholarly Communication

The Office of Scholarly Communication, which is based at the UL, can assist graduate researchers (as well as academic staff) with the process of researching, writing and disseminating theses. Their website has advice on managing and storing data, on tools to communicate research, on engagement and outreach, and publishing and open access.

 

Copyright

Copyright


The following information is intended as a guide to copyright and does not constitute legal advice.

Copyright is one of a bundle of rights which help to ensure that a work is not used without permission.  Copyright is automatically granted once the work has been produced in a tangible form, for example written down.  In most cases the first copyright holder is the author of the work.

The rights of the author can be divided into two groups – the moral right to be identified as the author and the economic right to make money from their work. The author retains the moral rights but may choose to give away the economic rights, for example by publishing in a journal. More information about these rights can be found here.

Third party copyright refers to copyright that is owned by someone else. Legislation allows researchers to use short quotations, extracts or excerpts from others work as long as the use meets the requirements of ‘fair dealing for the purposes of criticism and review’.  If researchers wish to reuse content they have authored but already published it is important to check if the publisher will permit this.

Creative Commons provides a way to licence the use of material you create and share. Using a simple formula it allows creators to build a licence which suits their needs and authorised appropriate use of their work. Using a Creative Commons licence allows researchers to get more exposure for their work whilst maintaining control over its use.

For more information about copyright contact the Legal Services Office of the University.